Clearings in the Sky: Music by Women of the 19th & 20th Centuries

Clearings in the Sky: Music by Women of the 19th & 20th Centuries

October 4, 2019, 7 P.M. at Ascension Episcopal Parish 1823 SW Spring Street, Portland, Oregon 97201

Emma Mildred Riggle, soprano & piano
Hannah Brewer, piano

A collaboration between the music programs of Ascension Parish and St. Michael and All Angels Church, this recital will feature music by women of the Romantic period, including piano solos, piano duets and art songs by Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Clara Schumann, Amy Beach, and Lili Boulanger. The Oct. 4 recital will take place in Ascension’s Parlor in the style of an intimate 19th Century Liederabend.

$15 suggested donation.

For more information:

Music@ascensionepiscopalparish.org
503-227-7806

 

Hail, Sweet Love: Devotional Music by Seventeenth-Century Women

Saturday, August 17, 2019, 7:00 PM
Ascension Episcopal Parish
1823 SW Spring Street, Portland
Samantha Arten, soprano
Emma Mildred Riggle, organ

Please join us for a recital of sacred early music by women composers, performed by soprano Dr. Samantha Arten of St. Louis University, and organist Emma Mildred Riggle, Minister of Music at Ascension Episcopal Parish. The concert will take place in Ascension’s charming and historic Sanctuary, and will feature our Baroque-style tracker organ. The program will include works by Francesca Caccini, Barbara Strozzi, Claudia Francesca Rusca, Isabella Leonarda, Lucretia Orsina Vizzana, and Maria Francesca Nascimbeni. A reception will follow the performance.

Suggested donation $15

Read more on Facebook and on Ascension’s website

The Feast of the Ascension

From the Rev. Simon Justice, rector of Church of the Good Samaritan, Corvallis

Today is a major Feast Day in the life of the Church, Ascension Day. The account of Jesus’ ascension into heaven is recorded in both of Luke the Evangelist’s works – the Gospel According to Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. It is interesting that the other three Gospels do not mention the Ascension, neither does Paul nor any of the other writers in the New Testament. So what’s Luke’s point? Two things, at least:

First, by ascending bodily into heaven, back into the full Presence of God, Abba, the Father, Jesus takes his humanity with him. In other words, Jesus takes what it is and what it means to be human into the very Presence of God. Jesus takes what we are right into heaven itself. Heaven and earth are now truly one.

Second, the Ascension underlines the fact that Jesus is physically gone. His Spirit is with us, always, but Jesus is no longer present with us in a physical sense. This means that the ministry he began is now in the hands of the Apostles – quite literally – and by extension us! We are now the hands, the feet, the voice and the presence of Jesus in the world. We are it! Jesus will always be with us, through the Holy Spirit, but the work, the ministry is now ours. Jesus shares it all with us. What a privilege, what a joy!